The Moline Young Men’s Christian Association

The Moline Young Men’s Christian Association was organized February 10, 1885. At that time the old rink was secured as temporary quarters and an efficient work carried on for several years. During the years of 1888 and 1889 a building fund was raised and a new structure erected which continued to be the home of the Association until destroyed some years later by fire. On January 1, 1903, the Association moved into the present quarters, where a steadily growing work has been maintained in the various departments, and whose spacious. well lighted rooms have become the home of the young men of Moline in a very special way. The Association is not alone his home, but as well his school room, his play ground. and his place of entertainment and Christian culture. In the night school conducted by the Association are taught all the common branches, such as arithmetic, algebra, penmanship, spelling and grammar, also English for Swedes and Greeks, in bath elementary and advanced courses. Other courses in mechanical and architectural drawing, electricity, telegraphy, bookkeeping, commercial law, and vocal music have been taught in the night school. In connection with the educational department a debating society is conducted, in which young men are trained in the art of public speaking. A physical department with well equipped gymnasium and expert physical director is a second phase of the work, affording a place for physical development under wholesome Christian influences. This department is participated in by both men and boys with great pleasure and profit. The bath rooms which are used daily by large numbers of men are the finest in the city. Fully 6,000 baths are furnished annually to members. No less than 35,000 visits are made to the rooms each year. The religious phase of the work is wide in scope, covering a vast field of religious education. Bible classes are conducted, men’s meetings with helpful addresses are held on Sunday afternoons and on week days meetings are held in the various shops of the city at the noon hour, where a large number of men listen to addresses and music by the best talent obtainable. There is also a corps of workers, comprising a male quartette and speakers, who visit the various churches and missions in suburban towns to conduct religious services. During the years of its existence the Moline Young Men’s Christian Association has made a place for itself in the city of inestimable value. Its aim has been to produce well rounded men in this and it has succeeded. The product of the Association has gone forth to raise the standards of moral living and to enrich the world.

 

City of Moline 

 

Source: Historic Rock Island County, pub. Kramer & Company, Rock Island, Illinois, 1908